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Your eyes are truly the windows to your soul: look after yours well with safe, natural, eco-friendly products, writes Beauty Editor Lisa Tristram.

Dragon’s blood

No, this cure-all ingredient does not come from a mythical creature, but from the reddish sap of a palm like plant from the Dracaena family. Long used as an internal medicine for stomach upsets and ulcers, as well as being used topically for wound healing, it typically dries fast, forming a protective layer on skin or mucous membranes, making it perfect for encouraging cellular regeneration; it is also exceptionally soothing for dry, fragile, or sensitive skin, making it a perfect choice for eye products. Find it in: Pure Heart Alchemy Vital Eyes Serum ($80.00, www.pureheartalchemy.com)

Tomato

For an eye cream? Yes! The antioxidant lycopene, which gives tomatoes their red colour, will also help to reduce dark circles and discolouration in the delicate eye area. And if you love making your own natural beauty remedies, try mashing tomato pulp into aloe vera gel and using it as a mask twice a week – so simple, yet very effective for boosting micro-circulation the skin's surface. Find it in: Aveda Wedding Eye Masque ($74.00, www.aveda.com)

Gold

Because you're worth it, right? Gold is not just a precious metal, but has a long history of use in beauty care, with generations of fabled beauties, including Cleopatra, having been said to have used it. Modern science shows that gold does, in fact, have the ability to smooth rough skin, reduce wrinkles, and boost collagen production, plus it is anti-inflammatory. Find it in: Edible Beauty Gold Rush Eye Balm ($83.00, www.ediblebeauty.com)

Chamomile

In medieval times, this pretty herb was strewn on floors to encourage sweet dreams, and is soothing to the skin as well as to the nerves. Being mild and delicate, is particularly appropriate in products for sensitive or dehydrated skin, like around the eyes – current research shows it is actually on a par with conventional cortisone creams for easing eczema. Find it in: Endota spa Organics Advanced Eye Contour Cream ($50.00, www.endotaspa.com.au)
 

Evening primrose

This is an excellent ingredient for slowing the development of wrinkles and fine lines around the eyes, because it is exceptionally high in gamma linoleic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid which maintains healthy cell membranes, as well as entering the skin's upper layers and helping to prevent moisture loss. Of course, it has also achieved great renown as a remedy for premenstrual syndrome and menopausal problems, such as vaginal dryness; one tip, though: it can go rancid fairly easily, even when encapsulated, so store in dark glass in a cool place and discard after six months. Find it in: USPA Eye Contour Elixir ($60.00, www.uspa.com.au)

Eyebright

The clue is in the name! Eyebright, so-called since the 15th century by Western herbalists – has a long history of use for treating eye problems, such as conjunctivitis, sore eyes, and eye strain, as well as allergies, nasal infections, and colds. One of the forefathers of herbal medicine, Nicholas Culpeper, wrote that eyebright was “an excellent water to clear the sight”. Buy the tea or teabags from your local healthfood store or online, and then brew, cool and strain the liquid to use as an eye compress. Find it in: Dr Hauschka Volume Mascara ($54.00, www.drhauschka.com.au)

Blue cornflower

“Cornflower blue” is often used to describe very bright, almost startlingly blue eyes, and indeed, the pretty cornflower is as bright and richly blue as an iris when in full bloom. Its history of use goes back to the ancient Egyptians, who believed it had the power to resurrect the dead! It also boasts a long traditional history as a remedy for eye infections and ailments, and is listed as such in many of the herbal texts of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. Today, cornflower is used for a wide variety of naturopathic treatments, including for liver and kidney problems, gastrointestinal upsets, and period pain. It contains potassium, which may ease eye strain, so if you look at screens all day, try taking cornflower tea daily or using the cooled, strained tea as an eye bath. Find it in: Cedar + Stone’s Beauty Tea and Bath Herbs in Eye Brighten ($15.00, www.biome.com.au)

Lisa Tristram is a natural skincare expert, aromatherapist, organic educator, and mind-body wellness teacher. www.lisatristram.com